Vol. 8 No. 2 (2021): Maria Montessori, her times and our years. History, vitality and perspectives of an innovative pedagogy
Maria Montessori, her times and our years

The Contribution of “A Sister of Notre Dame” and the “Nun of Calabar” to Montessori Education in Scotland, Nigeria and Beyond

Maria Patricia Williams
PhD at UCL Institute of Education, London, UK
Sr Mary Ligouri HHCJ in Nigeria
Published November 4, 2021
Keywords
  • Montessori,
  • Catholic,
  • missionary,
  • Nigeria,
  • Scotland
How to Cite
Williams, M. P. (2021). The Contribution of “A Sister of Notre Dame” and the “Nun of Calabar” to Montessori Education in Scotland, Nigeria and Beyond. Rivista Di Storia dell’Educazione, 8(2), 123-132. https://doi.org/10.36253/rse-10344

Abstract

Although the English Montessori Movement was declining, two educators, trained in the Method in England in the 1920s, contributed significantly to the continuity of Montessori education. “A Sister of Notre Dame”, was the anonymous author of A Scottish Montessori School, published in1932. The “Nun of Calabar”, established Montessori schools between 1926 and 1934 in Nigeria. Their work is placed within the political, social, and cultural context of the time.

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